OAK Law Project Release Two New Guides

‘A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository'
This guide examines and explains the copyright issues involved in depositing and accessing material in digital repositories. The guide focuses on effective management and promotion of digital repositories and in doing so, examines the relationships between the parties involved in the deposit and access process. Licensing requirements and options are also considered in detail. Finally, the guide touches on more technical considerations, such as software and metadata.
OAK Law Project Repository Guide

Copyright Guide for Research Students: What you need to know about copyright before depositing your electronic thesis in an online repository
This guide is designed to assist research students in managing copyright issues which they may encounter in writing and depositing their electronic thesis in an online repository. The guide provides a broad overview of copyright law and importantly addresses critical issues relating to the inclusion of third party copyright material in a students thesis. The guide aims to simplify these issues through the inclusion of two model third party copyright permission requests, which students can use to obtain permission from the copyright owner before including third party material.
Copyright Guide for Research Students

Legal Framework for e-Research Conference 2007

Submitted by Scott on Tue, 2007-04-24 15:16.

The Legal Framework for e-Research Conference held on Queensland's Gold Coast during 11 and 12 July 2007 was a great success.

Seven international keynote speakers, together with prominent Australian research identities, provided insightful, encouraging and challenging perspectives on the issues to be considered for the development of an effective legal framework that facilitates e-Research.

The slides and audio recordings of many of the presentations are available CLICK HERE. Further presentations will be made available shortly.

The Legal Framework for e-Research project is funded by the Australian Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST), under the Research Information Infrastructure Framework of Australian Higher Education, as part of the Commonwealth Government's Backing Australia's Ability – An Innovation Action Plan for the Future (BAA) report.

OAK Law Report cited in Productivity Commission Research Report

On 9 March 2007, the Australian Government Productivity Commission released its Productivity Commission Research Report: Public Support for Science and Innovation.

The Report examines research infrastructure and the economic impact of public support for science and innovation in Australia. It also identifies impediments to research and innovation affecting knowledge transfer, collaboration between research organisations and industry and the creation and use of intellectual property.

The Open Access to Knowledge (OAK) Law Project, funded by the Federal Government and based at QUT, has proposed strategic copyright management as a way to enhance access to publicly-funded research.

The OAK Law Project Report highlights the importance of understanding the roles and relationships played out in research and innovation, in order to properly structure the degree of ‘openness' required for academic and research materials.

The Productivity Commission Research Report cites the OAK Law Project Report (www.oaklaw.qut.edu.au) as providing “a framework for enhancing the management of copyright interests in research and academic output (including electronic theses and dissertations)."

The Productivity Commission also quotes from ‘Building Blocks for the Australian Accessibility Framework', a Campus Review article by Professor Brian Fitzgerald, who heads the OAK Law Project. Professor Fitzgerald explains, “Open access to knowledge in the form of data held by government and key research institutions throughout Australia could sponsor untold innovation in areas as diverse as water management, construction and precise positioning agriculture."

In the Report, the OAK Law Project is commended for its “forward work program [which] includes developing template guidelines for open access policies that can be adopted within university and research institutions, and developing model publishing agreements and model agreements to assist the copyright management of open access repositories."

In summarising its view, the Productivity Commission concludes “that the progressive introduction of a mandatory [repository deposit] requirement would better meet the aim of free and public access to publicly funded research results."

The Productivity Commission “continues to hold the view that funding agencies should take an active role in promoting open access to the results of the research they fund, including data and research papers."

The OAK Law Project is funded by the Australian Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training, under the Research Information and Infrastructure Framework for Australian Higher Education as part of the Backing Australia's Ability – An Innovation Plan for the Future.

Our Repository Guide launched!

Submitted by annie on Wed, 2007-04-18 15:52.

The Open Access to Knowledge (OAK) Law Project has launched a guide for organisations and academic institutions who implement and manage digital repositories. We believe the guide will be beneficial to repository managers as a practical day-to-day tool.

‘A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository' examines and explains the copyright issues involved in depositing and accessing material in digital repositories. It also considers how open access can be best developed for digital repositories in line with legal protocols.

The guide focuses on effective management and promotion of digital repositories and in doing so, examines the relationships between the parties involved in the deposit and access process. Licensing requirements and options are also considered in detail. Finally, the guide touches on more technical considerations, such as software and metadata.

We see the guide as a building block towards a broader accessibility framework. While the focus is Australian law, it has potential to be adapted to other jurisdictions.

Click here to view ‘A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository'.

Knowledge Policy for the 21st Century

Professor Fitzgerald has been invited to present at the Knowledge Policy for the 21st Century from 9-10 April at the University of Western Ontario, Canada.

QUT Faculty of Law in conjunction with Western Law will run two exciting conferences: Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) as Democratic Principle; and, Digital Copyright in a User Generated World.

Other speakers at the conferences include Peter Black (QUT Law Faculty, Freedom to differ) and Scott Kiel-Chisholm (OAK Law Project).

Click here for CONFERENCE DETAILS AND REGISTRATION.

Eminent Harvard Law Professor to Deliver Public Lectures

In the first week of March, QUT's Intellectual Property: Knowledge, Culture and Economy research program and Program Director Professor Brian Fitzgerald will host two keynote addresses, “Drugs, Law and the Global Health Crisis" and “Copyright and the Future of Entertainment", by visiting speaker William (Terry) Fisher, Hale and Dorr Professor of Intellectual Property Law, Harvard University and Director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society (www.tfisher.org).

Further details of Professor Fisher's Brisbane Lectures are available in the official flyers:

Copyright and the Future of Entertainment

Drugs, Law, and the Global Health Crisis

New ARC rules encourage open access research

Moves to encourage legal open access to all research funded under the Australian Research Council’s Discovery

Projects scheme are welcomed by Queensland University of Technology legal copyright academics. Professor Brian Fitzgerald, who heads the Open Access to Knowledge (OAK) Law Project, funded by the Federal Government and based at QUT, said the ARC had announced it would encourage researchers whose projects it had funded to place data and publications in online, open repositories such as QUT’s eprints (www.eprints.qut.edu.au)

He said researchers concerned about copyright issues when making their findings openly and easily accessible according to ARC requirements would find a comprehensive guide to copyright management strategies in the OAK Law Report published online this year.

“The ARC’s announcement highlights the importance of good copyright management practices in systems designed to promote open access to academic and research output,” Professor Fitzgerald said.

Read Full Media Release

Funding Body Encourages Open Access to Research Data and Articles

Submitted by Scott on Wed, 2006-12-13 15:40.

In early December 2006, the Australian Research Council (ARC) released its Discovery Projects Funding Rules for funding commencing in 2008. Section 1.4.5 is directed towards dissemination of research outputs. Subsection 1.4.5.3 states that the ARC encourages researchers to deposit their data and any publications arising from the research project into a subject and/or institutional repository within a six month period. Researchers are required to inform the ARC of the reasons for not doing so.

While not a mandatory requirement to deposit research data and articles into a repository, the effect will be that researchers will make every effort to comply with the rule. This will result in greater access to knowledge through open access to research data and articles, an outcome discussed, recommended and supported by the OAK Law Project Report No. 1.